Ok, Here’s the Skinny on the Hamburger Menu. Don’t use it.

It’s not User-centric. My (skinny) reasons:

1) It’s generally found in the top left corner of the screen. That’s just hard to reach.

2) It’s generic and non-descriptive.

Note: If you are considering a Hamburger-type menu feature, then:

- design a custom navigation-access icon, something other than a hamburger, unless you are McDonald’s. Make it relevant to your app. 

- put it at the bottom of the page, maybe centered above the tab navigation bar.

The rest is up to you, that's why they pay you the big bucks, right? Go get ‘em!

What Makes a Designer Good at What They Do?

Hand-drawn Inspiration Making Your Own Calendar

Calendars are some times necessary as a part of UX. How they work with a product can be a challenge, and everyone uses them differently. Usually it’s best to be as simple, and as custom as possible to suit the needs of the product. Like any feature, even calendars, sketching helps define how to solve this problem. But I never really thought about drawing my own calendar on paper as a UX experiment. 

Rather than use a digital calendar system, or even a printed calendar, Craig Mod did just that. Craig drew his own monthly calendar to help him to address things in his life that he wanted to track better, enhance and make more productive. 

Like any kind of problem, defining it, writing and drawing it, then focusing on it over time can yield better results, or at least some new and useful insights. 

Check out what Craig Mod learned from drawing his own calendar: https://goo.gl/Y822GU

A Conversation About Fantasy User Interfaces + Subtraction.com

The end of app stores? Yep

Understanding Product Design | Easy User Experience

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Text Line Texture by Thomas Hallgren

My first book on design thinking for children was published in 2015. It's on Amazon, the link is below. Hope you enjoy reading it to your children and grandchildren.
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When confronted out of the blue by a thin red Line, our main character, Text, sets out on a fun path of self discovery. A path that leads to a new friendship along the way. For parents who love to read to their children, Text Line Texture is the perfect introduction into the world of text-only books. Children’s Book. Age range: 4-10.